films we just saw

Chat here about anything horror related. Be it movies, news, remakes or events.
streetrw
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Post by streetrw » Tue Jan 29, 2008 1:38 pm

On Haneke....

I've never really felt any complicity with the killer in any sense beyond enjoying the - and this word cannot be emphasised enough - FAKE fairground ride. With that wink to the Funny Games audience that "this is what you came to see" Haneke's essentially wrong because ultimately I'm not on the killers' side. I'm on the family's side. I'm on the victim's side.

Haneke's technique of absolute naturalism means it's less FAKE; it's less a movie and more the unblinking, unwavering gaze of CCTV surveillance coverage. That's one of the reasons it feels more uncomfortable: there's no illusion - camerawork, music, the presence of Robert Englund - on display. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer pulls a subtler variation: to start with we're watching Henry and his associate torture and kill a family, but then we're actually watching the video the two men shot of themselves committing the crimes.

Because of that naturalistic approach, the violence looks real and is presented as real. Hellraiser, Halloween, Dracula and Friday the 13th are not. The machete-through-the-skull money shots might look realistic, and the "blood" spurts out just like it probably would in real life, but there's never a moment when it's obviously anything other than a crafted illusion. By removing that safety net of obvious fiction, what we're watching in Funny Games is more like a Crimewatch reconstruction than anything else. And who watches those for cheap thrills?

It rather feels as if Haneke's suggesting the audience can't tell fiction from reality just because he's blurred the lines. Frankly I feel insulted by that. I think I "get" what he's doing, at least partly. I just don't like it very much.
Last edited by streetrw on Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Melvin Junko » Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:02 pm

saw Violent shit last night. And that was just what is was; shit, but violent. I loved the 3rd one, it absolutely had me in stitches. So i got 1 and 2, and I don't think I've ever seen a movie with less story then violent shit 1. Throw in some shitty camera effects, no subtitles and shit sound quality and you don't have much left.

apart from wasp in the soundtrack and the 'fucked with a knife' scene, very cannibal corpse. That bit made me laugh.
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Post by streetrw » Wed Jan 30, 2008 12:12 am

Melvin Junko wrote:saw Violent shit last night. And that was just what is was; shit, but violent. I loved the 3rd one, it absolutely had me in stitches. So i got 1 and 2, and I don't think I've ever seen a movie with less story then violent shit 1. Throw in some shitty camera effects, no subtitles and shit sound quality and you don't have much left.
I saw Violent Sh*t 2: Mother Hold My Hand some 14 years ago in Northampton and I thought it was vile! I can't remember any kind of plot except a long scene of a naked girl on a sunbed (I don't think anything happened to her, it was just a bit of softcore drooling over bare flesh), and some full-frontal genital mutilation sequences thrown in for maximum lipsmacking shock effect. Which I couldn't really get behind even if they'd been well staged.

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Post by trixybella » Wed Jan 30, 2008 6:18 am

I saw Sweeney Todd last Friday (Yes I know it's almost a week) and I loved it! It had everything I absolutely wanted from a movie, and I was completely prepared to pay to go straight back into the next screening.

The singing was good in the main, Helena Bonham Carter was a complete surprise, I fell completely for her character. And her wardrobe. And her hair (can you see where this is going?). Depp was his usual wonderful self, although I did struggle to disassociate Todd from Jack Sparrow at times due to the similarities in accent.

Still, easily the best film I've seen in ages!
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Post by lupogirl » Wed Jan 30, 2008 8:39 am

Have to say i enjoyed Sweeney Todd. Loved the dark gothic look and Johnny Depp singing did sound like Dick Van Dyke. Some great moments of blood letting. Not sure if I would rush off see it a second time though
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Post by Team Banzai » Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:03 am

good to hear that most of you are grooving with sweeney - i'm with trixy that i really wanted to see it again as soon as i came out.

loving the debate on haneke as well ... has prompted me to finally watch cache. i always found funny games a bit arch and clever clever - perhaps i should re-watch, the US remake seems to have garnered hugely differing opinions from those that i know have seen it. so i guess that he has once again succeeded in his mission of challenging and dividing audiences.

for this, like lynch - he gets my vote in this age of mediocrity, for at least attempting to push the art and form of film. even if sometimes unsuccessfully.

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Post by giles edwards » Wed Jan 30, 2008 12:19 pm

Sweeney Todd... was one of the biggest pleasures in months for me and simply a beautiful digital presentation in Leicester Sqaure on opening night. What with Lust/Caution, Michael Clayton and No Country For Old Men, this is one of the richest months of filmgoing in recent memory for me. I'd suggest genuinley richer and more satsifying than the (in hindsight) rather overated couple months in 1999, that seems to continue be a benchmark for the modern cinephile, regardless of a lot of the luster from those films waining...

On a nother note, I Am Legend was pretty rancid. Some good moments (not of it involving the Flubber-like CGI), but overall a rather ponderous rendition of a brilliantly compelling, perhaps simply too-introspective-for-cinema original story. And that ending: what with the horribly forced Bob Marley stuff, the light-into-darkness spiritualism guff that sprang from nowhere and the sepia-tinted final shots, it felt like I was watching a Fox Faith movie or one of those Left Behind sequels. What a disappointment. Still, I have The Omega Man unopened at home, so perhaps that'll do the trick. Or I could always just read the novella again.
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Post by streetrw » Wed Jan 30, 2008 1:53 pm

It looks like I've seen most of the current genre movies in my local Blockbusterette (they've got Boogeyman 2, I Know Who Killed Me and Lake Placid 2 on the shelf, but I'm waiting till they come down from the ridiculous £4 a night). So last night I was reduced to Riding The Bullet, a DTV Stephen King adaptation by regular King adapter Mick Garris.

It's awful. It's not scary, it's not even that interesting, the hero is a blank, and a whole load of elements make no sense. Finally, it doesn't actually go anywhere. It actually makes my other rental - an action quickie with Wesley Snipes - look the more appetising prospect.

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Post by giles edwards » Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:28 pm

Haha -- that's one of our releases!
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Post by streetrw » Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:48 pm

giles edwards wrote:Haha -- that's one of our releases!
????????? :)

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Post by giles edwards » Wed Jan 30, 2008 3:59 pm

Yeah, Riding The Bullet -- it was sitting around for ages without a distributor. But you know, Mick Garris, Stephen King...all good marketable stuff. It's done pretty well. And it's not Children Of The Corn VII.

Don't sweat it, I not sure how scary it set out to be. It was always meant to be more Stand By Me than Pet Semetary, says Garris.
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Post by streetrw » Fri Feb 01, 2008 12:57 pm

Once more, my profound thanks to Imajica for pointing me in LoveFilm's direction, otherwise I'd never have seen The Sweet House Of Horrors, one of the Houses Of Doom movies made for Italian TV and one of the two directed by Lucio Fulci. It begins with the gratuitously nasty murder of a couple, but then switches gear almost into the realm of fairy stories: focussing on their kids as, perhaps through the power of thought, they conjure up their parents as ghosts, and inflict pain and retribution on anyone who'd take them away from the family estate. The dubbing's as bad as you'd expect, continuity errors abound, and Fulci hadn't lost the knack for miscasting the least adorable moppets he can find (House By The Cemetery, City of the Living Dead). Oh, and in true Fulci tradition it doesn't make a lot of sense. It's nowhere near the barking mad Fulci we love of old, but the opening reel has some extraordinary violence and the final third has the great Vernon Dobtcheff hamming away as a medium, and some ill-advised knockabout comedy that seems to have strayed in from The Goodies or something.

Fulci's other entry in the quadrilogy, The House Of Clocks, arrived as well and should hopefully get seen tonight. The other entries (by Umberto Lenzi) are high-prioritised on my LF queue.

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Post by streetrw » Sat Feb 02, 2008 2:46 am

Yes, Fulci's The House Of Clocks was indeed seen tonight and it's the same brand of incomprehensible madness though without the moppets. This time, three "young people" (interests: shoplifting, drugs and cruelty to household pets) plot to rob an elderly couple, unaware that there are corpses upstairs, a one-eyed gardener and about 400 clocks in the house. The couple (apparently dubbed by Peggy Ashcroft and John Gielgud) have some sort of power over the flow of time which comes in handy when they're accidentally brutally murdered. Nothing much in the way of demented gore this time, and unfortunately not much of anything else, though the sparrow in the opening reel gave me the best laugh of the year so far.

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Post by thesavageintruder » Mon Feb 04, 2008 12:03 am

I have been bowled over by this year's releases so far...NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN was hypnotic, SWEENEY TODD soooo much fun and IN THE VALLEY OF ELAH powerful and moving without condescending to the audience. I just got back from CLOVERFIELD...and for once it more than lived up to the hype. It just might be the ultimate monster movie...i certainly dont remember being so terrified by a movie monster in a long long time. Horribly familiar, and brilliantly captured, scenes of New York City in a state of panic and devastation from an enemy no one understands or can do anything about. Superb use of the first-person-narrative device. Some bonafide heart-in-mouth scares, specially on the subway. And a hauntingly effective ending that's astonishingly grim for a mainstream studio release (and very similar to a great little movie called MIRACLE MILE from which, in fact, CLOVERFIELD borrows its main plot hook). Great stuff, and loved the GODZILLA-style music over the end credits too.

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Post by Team Banzai » Mon Feb 04, 2008 12:44 am

yep clover is a lot o fun - and actually more frightening after 1st viewing.
did you catch the audio teaser at the end of the music and credits?

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